More Examples

“Always double-check the bitcoin address before you send.”

“Send me my fantasy football winnings… I’ll text you my bitcoin address.”

“The HR department needed my bitcoin address for direct deposit.”

Definition(s) from the Web

  1. A Bitcoin address is similar to a physical address or an email. It is the only information you need to provide for someone to pay you with Bitcoin. An important difference, however, is that each address should only be used for a single transaction. Source
  2. A Bitcoin invoice address, or simply invoice, is an identifier of 26-35 alphanumeric characters, beginning with the number 1, 3 or bc1 that represents a possible destination for a bitcoin payment. Invoices can be generated at no cost by any user of Bitcoin. It is also possible to get a Bitcoin invoice address using an account at an exchange or online wallet service… Like e-mail addresses, you can send bitcoins to a person by sending bitcoins to one of their invoice addresses. However, unlike e-mail addresses, people have many different Bitcoin invoice addresses and for privacy and security reasons a unique invoice should be used for each transaction. Most Bitcoin software and websites will help with this by generating a brand new invoice each time you create an invoice or payment request. A naive way to accept bitcoin as a merchant is to tell your customers to send money to a single invoice address. However this does not work because Bitcoin transactions are public on the block chain, so if a customer Alice sends you bitcoins then a malicious agent Bob could see that same transaction and send you an email claiming that he paid. You would have no way of knowing whether it was Alice or Bob who send coins to your invoice. This is why each customer must be given a brand new invoice. Source
  3. Bitcoin address is an identifier (account number), starting with 1 or 3 and containing 27-34 alphanumeric Latin characters (except 0, O, I). Bitcoin addresses can be also represented as a QR-code. The addresses are anonymous and do not contain information about the owner. A bitcoin address can be obtained for free, using, for example, Bitcoin software. Bitcoin address example: 14qViLJfdGaP4EeHnDyJbEGQysnCpwk3gd. Addresses can be generated at no cost by any user of Bitcoin. For example, using Bitcoin Core, one can click “New Address” and be assigned an address. It is also possible to get a Bitcoin address using an account at an exchange or online wallet service. Source
  4. In the blockchain, bitcoins are registered to bitcoin addresses. Creating a bitcoin address requires nothing more than picking a random valid private key and computing the corresponding bitcoin address. This computation can be done in a split second. But the reverse, computing the private key of a given bitcoin address, is practically unfeasible. Users can tell others or make public a bitcoin address without compromising its corresponding private key. Moreover, the number of valid private keys is so vast that it is extremely unlikely someone will compute a key-pair that is already in use and has funds. The vast number of valid private keys makes it unfeasible that brute force could be used to compromise a private key. To be able to spend their bitcoins, the owner must know the corresponding private key and digitally sign the transaction. The network verifies the signature using the public key; the private key is never revealed. If the private key is lost, the bitcoin network will not recognize any other evidence of ownership; the coins are then unusable, and effectively lost. For example, in 2013 one user claimed to have lost 7,500 bitcoins, worth $7.5 million at the time, when he accidentally discarded a hard drive containing his private key. About 20% of all bitcoins are believed to be lost -they would have had a market value of about $20 billion at July 2018 prices. To ensure the security of bitcoins, the private key must be kept secret. If the private key is revealed to a third party, e.g. through a data breach, the third party can use it to steal any associated bitcoins. Source

See Also

Bitcoin Address


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